Articles tagged London

If you’re enjoying London’s hot weather this week, why not imagine doing so while swimming in mid-air?

Arup Associates has designed an innovative ‘sky pool’, a 25-metre-long swimming pool which will bridge two blocks of apartments in Nine Elms, south London.

The pool, inspired by aquariums, will be completely transparent, affording swimmers with striking views of the city as they paddle and tread water.

Apartment developer Ballymore Group’s CEO, Sean Mulryan, said: “The Sky Pool’s transparent structure is the result of significant advancements in technologies over the last decade. The experience of the pool will be truly unique, it will feel like floating through the air in central London.”

Find out more about the Sky Pool here and tell us if you would have a swim in it.




London architecture firm Bblur has designed an epic slide, which will wrap around the tallest sculpture in the UK.

The ArcelorMittal Orbit, an observation tower in London’s Olympic Park, will be home to a slide that allows visitors to exit the tower in a more stylish way than usual - at 15mph.

The slide itself, which will be around 180m long, will get riders to the bottom in approximately 40 seconds, giving them a unique view of the city skyline along the way.

Opening in spring 2016, the slide may become a new hit tourist attraction - read more about this fun idea here.





A collection of black and white images reveals the ‘last days’ of London, capturing the city as old traditions made way for the metropolis we recognise today.

Photographer Colin O’Brien has been documenting the city’s changes since 1948, taking some of the final pictures of the old Covent Garden Market before it closed for good.

O’Brien also captured a long-forgotten tram back in 1952, one of the last rag and bone men in 1980s Hackney, and Woolworths' last day of trading, compiling the images in his new book, 'London Life'.

See more of the pictures here and tell us what you think of this intriguing insight into history.





Kellogg’s new publicity stunt has seen its ‘breakfast team’ take over London Underground.

The breakfast team have taken ‘fridges’ onto the tube, holding everything from milk and cereal to utensils such as cutlery and bowls.

However, to unsuspecting commuters the fridge looks like a normal suitcase - until of course, it’s opened mid-journey.

This campaign is targeted at the ‘busy workers’ who are skipping breakfast all together.

A Kellogg’s spokesperson said: “With almost 1 in 3 adults missing breakfast every day, we wanted to show that even for people with the busiest lifestyles, there’s always time for a bowl of Special K cereal.”

Watch the unsuspecting commuters below and tell us what you think.


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The Imperial War Museum has released rare colour photos of London during the Second World War.

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Blitz, the museum has revealed unique footage covering London life, from famous landmarks to everyday scenes, in full colour.

The photos reveal how the Blitz, which took place between September 1940 and May 1941, affected the capital city, from the patriotic hoarding on Nelson's Column to the dramatic ruins around St Paul's Cathedral.

These amazing photos are part of a larger exhibition called 'Horrible Histories: Blitzed Brits', which you can discover in Manchester's Imperial War Museum until April 2016.

Take a look at these rare photographs here and tell us if you'll be going to the exhibition.





A Turkish architecture studio has unveiled a unique public installation outside London's Royal Academy of Arts.

SO? Architecture and Ideas has created The Unexpected Hill, which will host performances and activities until Sunday 20th September.

A response to the Royal Academy’s 'transformation' theme, the installation consists of blue and white ceramic triangular prisms stacked and staggered to create a 3D public seating area for visitors.

The studio was inspired by ‘Muqarnas’, a design technique typically found in Islamic architecture, which co-founder Sevince Bayrak described as 'an example of using geometry to convert a 2D object into a 3D space'.

Discover the Unexpected Hill here and tell us if you'll be visiting.





Cancer Research UK has launched an innovative art trail, based on the DNA double helix.

The organisation has teamed up with SomeOne to install twenty one DNA-inspired sculptures around London, in order to raise awareness for the Francis Crick Institute.

The double helix sculptures has been customised by top artists, including Ai Weiwei and Orla Kiely.

The pieces range from the sleek and futuristic to the colourful and avant-garde, celebrating the complexity of DNA.

Along with Rosalind Franklin, Maurice Wilkins, and James Watson, Francis Crick discovered the structure of DNA in the 1950s.

These amazing installations will be placed around London for ten weeks; discover them here and tell us if you'll be looking out for them.





Coca-Cola has decided to measure the happiness of Londoners this summer as part of its ongoing 'Choose Happiness' campaign.

The brand has created ‘happiness meters’, using real-time social data and outdoor advertising, which will analyse any tweets using the hashtag #ChooseHappiness.

300 digital billboards in the capital will show the ever-changing results of the happiness meters, along with promotions for the events supporting the campaign, including phone-in competitions and deliveries of chilled Coca-Cola to London parks.

Find out more about the campaign, which is running throughout August and September, here and tell us if you'll be choosing happiness.





Have you always wanted to know in advance if a pub still has seats on a hot summer day? Well, Pimm’s has launched new billboard posters that will let you know.

The brand has installed innovative sensor-activated digital posters throughout London, which will activate when the temperature reaches 16 degrees Celsius and will update you with seating space information in your area.

Using beacon technology to sense when the participating pubs and beer gardens have space, the ads will also change their messaging depending on the weather data they receive.

Learn more about this innovative campaign here and let us know if you'll be paying attention to the Pimm's posters.





A map of London slang has been released, proving there's more to the capital's vocabulary than the 'apples and pears' of Cockney Rhyming Slang.

Cartographer Adam Dant and lexicographer Jonathon Green have created Argotopolis, a map that covers London slang according to different neighbourhoods.

From the melting pot colloquialisms of Notting Hill to the Yiddish of Hampstead, the map typifies each area with a residence or building (such as Selfridges or David Cameron's House).

A limited edition of 50 hand-tinted prints is available, while an online version lets you can brush up on your London lingo and discover the heroes of slang.

Take a look at this original map here and tell us what other (polite) London slang you know.